Tag Archives: Rose ‘William Lobb’

Tuesday View

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The hornbeams frame ‘Ghislaine de Feligonde’ as you turn the corner onto the Long Border

Firstly, may I apologise to all of those whose vases from yesterday I still haven’t visited. Suffice it to say that I am struggling to carry on blogging at the moment. I look forward to visiting, commenting and enjoying over the next few days.

Here is the border at the moment. My first picture (above) is at the far end of the border (against the garden wall). You can see a plan of my garden here if you are already lost.

We move around from deep shade and lovely Rose ‘Ghislaine de Feligonde’ is there. Here she is.

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And then you look left, and you have your view towards the Long Border.

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It is even wilder and woollier than last week.

Looking in the opposite direction, towards ‘Ghislaine de Feligonde’ again.

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Some nice things are beginning to happen. I have quite a few plants of Salvia sylvestris, grown from seed, now coming into flower.

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And a lot of tangles, although I have managed to rescue my little (soon, hopefully, to be big) Onopordon acanthium from the clutches of the weigela on the bank.

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The orange of the hemerocallis is even more appalling than last year with moss rose ‘William Lobb’. Unfortunately you can get used to it, but I musn’t.

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You can’t fault ‘William Lobb’, however, as a rose (if you like big plants).

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Next year I will learn how to control the corncockles. But when you grew something pretty from seed, it’s called Agrostemma githago ( treasured British native) and you love it, it’s hard to dig your heels in. Especially when it’s growing up through Rosa rubrifolia (I can’t remember what I’m supposed to call it now!).

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The Thalictrum flavum ssp. glaucum is finally in full flower. I’ve been using the grey foliage and tight flowerbuds in vases for a while now.

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As are the elegant, curvy spires of Veronicastrum virgicum.

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So that’s it. Many thanks to Cathy for hosting this lovely Tuesday meme at ‘Words and Herbs’, in which we record weekly what a part of our garden looks. Do think of taking part – I’m finding it’s really helping me to think about what I like (and don’t like).

I sincerely hope I have more time next week. Looking foward to visiting you soon!

Tuesday View

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Raining heavily this morning and so, after a two-week pause, I’ve the leisure of time to contribute again to Cathy’s ‘Tuesday View’ meme at Words and Herbs.

Unfortunately the Asphodeline lutea more or less came and went during my time away from the garden. When I arrived back there were still some spikes looking good, but I didn’t get my camera out fast enough. Lazy, lazy … and the same lazy gardener is late again cutting the grass.

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Also making an appearance – some rather nice yellow irises and a newly planted Achillea ‘Moonshine’. I’m bound to lose the latter after a couple of years, so must make sure I propagate it next spring to keep it going in the garden. Did you know that it was one of the 5 plants that the late, great Alan Bloom was most proud of introducing? The rose just off centre right is the first to flower properly in the border, ‘Lady Emma Hamilton’.

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Berries of Asphodeline lutea

Now there are only the bright green berries and a few small yellow starry flowers of the asphodel left. I do enjoy their effect in the Long Border, so a bit sad, but there’s always next year.

The roses had a frosting in early May, and lost quite a few buds, so they are really only just coming back into their own. Moss rose, ‘William Lobb’ was the exception. We call this the ‘monster’ rose at Chatillon. I keep cutting it back after flowering, but it persists in sending up long ungainly shoots for next year’s flowers.

Unfortunately it blooms at the same time as a bright orange hemerocallis that I inherited when we moved into the garden. The hemerocallis are definitely scheduled for removal this autumn because another year with the colour clash is going to give me a headache!

I wish I liked hemerocallis more. They do really well here, with the heat and the clay soil, but I have an aversion to their rather heavy flowers. Must work on changing that … Learn to love what loves you!

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Mossy little buds of ‘William Lobb’ – the one known as ‘Old Velvet Moss’. It’s an incredibly healthy rose – just a tad over-vigorous!

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‘William Lobb’ never behaved as badly in a previous garden where I had it planted. A much more dignified tall shrub.

Looking in the opposite direction down the border, I hope you can make out at the very far end against the wall Rose ‘Ghislaine de Feligonde’?

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The peachy blooms of Ghislaine are in the top left corner of the photo.

The rose is not actually in the border itself, but growing against the garden wall. Last year, with all our rain at rose time, it was a washout. Fabulous show this season to make up for it.

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I missed my chance to cut the four hazels in the Long Border back this February and, as a result, the herbaceous plants towards the front of the border are far more shaded out than I would like. Even the philadelphus planted on the bank have been rather over-shadowed by the hazels and we can’t really see their flowers properly.

I’ve coppiced the four hazels in the Long Border once, three years ago, when I first dug and planted the border. Since they are too big this year, I think it might be worth reducing that to every 2 years – or perhaps stagger the coppicing? Cut back 2 hazels one year, another 2 the next?

If you gardened here, with all our fierce heat in the summer, you’d understand my reluctance to do such a regular coppice! (Never mind the fact that all that cutting and dragging is pretty heavy work.)

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I also seem to have lost some rather nice Helenium ‘Moerheim Beauty’ divisions that went into the ground last spring. I’ve no idea what happened – how can large clumps of plants just disappear? Anyway – there we are! That’s gardening life. I’m more philosophical than I used to be!

Enough of the problems – there is one rather pretty feature that appeals to me this week. The curling flower stems (still in bud) of Veronicastrum virginicum are looking quite charming with the grass Calamagrostis ‘America’.

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Hopefully you can make out the tempting pleated spikes of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ foliage rising up behind and amongst Artemesia ‘Lambrook Silver’? I’m quite enjoying the spikiness of the border.

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Go over and have a look at everyone’s Tuesday views at Cathy’s Words and Herbs. And many thanks to Cathy for graciously hosting this lovely meme that gives us a reason to record one area of our garden every Tuesday – and exchange (virtually) plant ideas and tips!