Category Archives: A vase on Monday

In a vase on Monday

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This is kind of an ‘hello’, ‘I’m still here’ vase, rather than a proper post! The Bon Viveur is home at the moment (until Wednesday), and so there’s little time, but a desire nonetheless to pick flowers.

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These were for our dinner table on Friday night. Still looking lovely on a misty, first day of October. We were lucky enough to get some rain and the temperatures have finally dropped.

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The michaelmas daisies (divided and replanted in the spring) are looking irresistible. They came as small plugs from Hayloft Plants about 3 years ago and were worth every penny, because asters do so well on the clay, in dry conditions.

With them is Zinnia ‘Benary’s Giant Lime’.

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I like the way that even when the zinnia doesn’t do its double ‘thing’ (and it frequently doesn’t), it still sometimes makes a small effort!

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Go over and look at the other lovely vases on Cathy’s ‘Rambling in the Garden‘. I will do my best to visit everyone’s vases after life has returned to a less than sparkling ‘normal’ speed!

In a vase on Monday

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I have a bit of a secret passion for Hybrid Tea roses – this isn’t very trendy at the moment, but I’ve never been ‘cool’; I just can’t help it! I love their perfectly shaped flowers when in bud and half open. I grow so many old-fashioned roses, but they never quite do that bud-perfection thing, in my eyes.

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About three years ago I planted three HTs in the cut flower garden: white ‘Pascali’, red ‘Mr Lincoln’ and (for the Bon Viveur who has a fetish for all yellow flowers), ‘Grandpa Dickson’. The white and red are great successes, which is just as well because I spent hours researching ‘best red HT for cutting’, and so on. ‘Grandpa Dickson’ has been less than willing, however, showing the usual problems with roses on my soil – they take two or three years to settle, before quitting their habit of dying back a bit during the season.

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I teamed ‘Pascali’ with cornflowers and clary sage (Salvia hormium), both from a very disappointing sowing of Sarah Raven’s ‘Amethyst & Sapphire Mix’ annuals. I tried to keep the ground moist, but the Alkinet (Anchusa ‘Blue Angel’) that I really wanted didn’t show. I think I might buy seed separately and sow in cells in the greenhouse next year. I wasn’t so bothered about the lack of Verbena bonariensis, also included in this four-variety mixture, because there’s plenty self-sowing elsewhere in the garden. It’s a nice idea – although it remains ‘theory’ here!

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I just scattered seed, which doesn’t usually work on my soil. Usually I sow cornflowers in situ with pot marigolds and nigella, because I like the way they all flower for a long time and hold each other up.

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But this year I had planned to change the position in which I put them (down in new beds in the orchard). Unfortunately the beds never got dug, so the annuals were never sown! But I’m already flexing my digging muscles to get it done this autumn.

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There’s also some statice (Limonium sinuatum), which started producing very late this year. In the past I’ve grown the more perennial sea lavender, Limonium latifolium, from seed. But when planted in the garden they just petered out.

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The container was a present from an ex-partner over 30 years ago. The little duck’s a bit of a cutie, but he’s usually swimming away from his vase in another (dusty) part of the house, currently being decorated.

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It was quite nice to reunite them – for probably the first time in about 10 years – with this IAVOM post. Hopefully they’ll become inseparable again now.

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The duck is actually a little trinket box. For the same incredibly long 30 years he’s been home to some flowers of edelweiss given to me by the gardeners when I left an garden in the Bavarian Alps where I did an exchange for a few weeks. I swore I’d go back, but they were right, I never did.  How many poignant little memories we all have tucked into dusty corners of our homes!

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The ususal cluttered home for my Monday vases!

Go on over and see what all the Monday vasers are doing at Cathy’s ‘Rambling in the Garden‘ blog.

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In a vase on Monday

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‘Noordwijks Glory’ is the dahlia face on here, with ‘Karma Choc’ to the right. Rose ‘Wollerton Old Hall’ just behind, with one flower of ‘Sweet Juliet’ to the right.

Here’s my contribution to Cathy’s meme at Rambling in the Garden. I used only dahlias and roses – and probably not as much foliage as I ought to have used!

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Dahlia ‘Karma Lagoon’

The dahlias are: ‘Karma Irene’ (red), ‘Karma Lagoon’ (purple), ‘La Recoleta’ (pom-pom, dark purple), ‘Karma Choc’, ‘Noordwijks Glory’ and the little single anemone-flowered ‘Totally Tangerine. Roses were ‘Wollerton Old Hall’, ‘Sweet Juliet’ and HT ‘Mr Lincoln’.

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‘Wollerton Old Hall’ (left), ‘Sweet Juliet’ (right), with a hint of Dahlia ‘Karma Irene’ beside it.

All are included just because they were ‘there’ and I wanted to try out a new plant-holder/vase, given to me by the kind parents of two 5- and 9-year-old children who I tutored in English this summer.

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This young couple from Lyon have close ties to Chatillon – both grandmother and great-grandmother live here – and spent the summer in the village before immigrating to New Zealand on 11 September.

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‘Sweet Juliet’

It’s a sad fact that rural France, in some areas, is increasingly depopulated with only oldies like me left. The French establishment and press refer endlessly to our ‘medical deserts’. And these are, of course, the areas where the oldies live! Places where the old doctors are retiring (or dying) and to which the young ones don’t wish to relocate.

The French health service is arguably unsurpassed in the world (a clever combination of a free public service and a top-up insurance service (referred to as your ‘complémentaire santé’), which patients pay for themselves monthly. So the public input is shored up financially by our own private input. But if you have a ‘carte vitale’ (and every French person has one, from a child) you are always entitled to all the health care basics.

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A slightly battered Dahlia ‘Totally Tangerine’

However, due to the size of the country, if you fall and break your leg (or neck, as has happened to two people I know), the emergency service in an area like ours will have to helicopter you to the nearest large hospital. Meanwhile, on the roads, fleets of taxi-ambulances (paid for by our ‘complementaires’) ferry patients the 50 minutes to hospitals for treatments such as dialysis or radiotherapy. And even as far as Paris (about 3.5 hours away), sometimes as often as once a fortnight, if you can only be treated there.

In winter the villages are quiet and nearly dead. But summer brings an inrush of grandchildren from Paris and further afield. Shouts of joy down by the river and bicycles in the streets again!

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It must be hard when parents, such as my students’ parents, decide to relocate to the other side of the world for a better life. Thiebault, the oldest, when asked what he was looking forward to most in New Zealand told me: ‘Living in a house!’ Apartment life in a city is the norm, life in the country the exception for most children. I hope they are settling in well, even if they are not in the house he dreams of yet!

I did try out my vase with different dahlias as well – more ‘Karma Serena’ and some ‘Playa Blanca’ – and this time added some snapdragons. The touch of green and the spikiness make it altogether a ‘perkier’ vase.

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Go on over and see the other vases at ‘Rambling in the Garden‘. They are always so different and inspiring. And have gifted me lots of new ideas over the years.

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In a vase on Monday

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Horrors, it seems that the last time I posted anything on my blog I was focused on daffodils and tulips! How time flies for this lazy gardener.

I vow to make it short and sweet from now on – so that I post more, instead of just thinking about it.

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This is my contribution to Cathy’s lovely meme at Rambling in the Garden. I picked more than two vases yesterday – four in all. The dahlias, zinnias and everything else are really getting up some steam now, in spite of the hot weather.

Last night, sitting eating my supper, I couldn’t stop looking at the zinnias, ‘Purple Prince’ and ‘Benary’s Giant Lime’. If you’d asked me 10 years ago if I could ever love something as ‘in your face’ as a zinnia, I’d have denied it. Can you notice in the pictures how ‘Purple Prince’ shows quite a lot of interesting variation. (Or maybe I just forgot I also sowed something else?!)

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Today the Ammi visagna that I put in to partner them is wilting. But then, everything is wilting at the moment.

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Fortunately the snapdragons, ‘White Giant’, ‘Crimson F1’ and ‘Appleblossom’ are heat-resistant, both in the house and in the garden.

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I can never thank Christina at Creating My Own Garden of the Hesperides enough for turning me on to them (although she doesn’t like them herself – what a twist!).

Because everything is so scorched and miserable, I think I’m loving my second vase more. The larkspur ‘Giant Imperial Mixed’ look nothing special against the parched earth, but in a vase with the red and white snappers, they are truly lush.

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Go on over and see everyone else’s vases – and I hope you come back here soon for a little update on my long-coveted greenhouse … which has not let me down this year, unlike the sweet peas!

In a vase on Monday … finally

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I now, officially, have ‘spring back’ – I’m sure I share this stiffness with many other gardeners in the Northern Hemisphere. But the garden looks a bit better, so it’s worth it.

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I wouldn’t swop the thrilling experience of this time of year for (most) other euphoric experiences. The sheer joy of going down to the garden, early in the morning, and seeing the tulips rising up out of all that fresh foliage (which will be looking decidedly browned off in another two months) …

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Today I was inspired by Tulip ‘Angelique’. It’s a peony-flowered tulip that I’ve wanted to grow for years – this morning I saw that it’s known as ‘America’s favourite’ – comments from American blogging friends? Finally a few were planted in the cut flower garden last autumn, near last year’s ‘Carnival de Nice’.

These tulips, in my humble opinion, are only for the vase – although I’m prepared to be converted! I’m afraid I may have overdone the Rembrandt/Fantin-Latour effect a little in the pictures, but I hope you can see what inspired me so much.

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They are teamed with the ‘Carnival de Nice’, which you may remember from an IOVM vase last year. I’ve been so pleased at how the Nice tulips have come back to give pleasure again. When a tulip looks as choice as this, you imagine that it’s now … and then never again (unless you buy some more).

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They are on our little supper terrace, where I take refuge from the heat in between cracking down below in the garden. I used a vase brought back from Spain by a dear friend …

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… and became rather mesmerised by how strong and well-formed the handle on the vase looks in this light.

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The little teacup is one of the last remaining bits of china from my Canadian grandmother – the crack that I observed in its side is more seriously leaky than I imagined – thank goodness the saucer holds all the water dripping through! It has a tulip pattern, which seemed appropriate when I broke off one perfect flower of ‘Angelique’.

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I’m hoping to do a post a little later in the week about some nice tulips and daffodils that are flowering (or have recently finished) here – and since the weather is a little cooler, might also catch up with the ironing and our tax returns this week as well. (Although, it has to be said, cooler weather is more pleasant to garden in, so I’ll be torn!)

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Tell me some of your favourite tulips I could add to my ever increasing shopping list?

So nice to be back with Cathy for her nice Monday meme at Rambling in the Garden. The other vases produced by the IAVOM folk are likely to be a little less ‘dark’ and more spring-like than my own. Go on over and see!

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In a vase on Monday

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I am struggling to post, what with all going on in the house and our lives. Still, here is my Vase on Monday.

Not too many words, but I’m fond of my (soon to be coppiced) hazel and my hellebores.

Yes, we also have snow, which makes our balcony really slippy going. (Nearly broke my neck taking these pictures!)

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Don’t the hellebores almost look like orchids if you half close your eyes? They started flowering (surprisingly) in November.

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The vase was a vide grenier find from a local glass company at Isches, now no longer existing. I love the fine tracery on the surface, but (as a second-hand buy) it is pretty flawed. More pretty than flawed …

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You may be interested to see that my ‘toilet arrangement’ is still flaunting itself in the living room. (Here’s the previous Vase on Monday, if you missed it.)

Perhaps a comment on how much dust we have around in the house at the moment, since it doesn’t seem worth replacing?

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The element I’m enjoying the most (apart from the darling little hazel catkins and the grasses) is the dried foliage of Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’.

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A funny way to say ‘Merry Christmas’, perhaps, but I’m going to post pictures of my magnificent – and long-awaited – greenhouse later in the week. And I’ll be just full of the right spirit then, because the Bon Viveur is on his way home for Christmas – see you soon and enjoy the next few days!

With many thanks to Cathy at Rambling in the Garden who always gets me happy and grateful when I think I’ve no energy left. Pop on over to her blog and see the other Christmassy vases.

Anniversary Vase on Monday

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Happy fourth anniversary to all the wonderful IAVOM people! And especially to Cathy at Rambling in the Garden who first thought up this terrific meme and takes such trouble every week to visit and appreciate everyone’s vases.

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For the anniversay, she set us the challenge of arranging in something other than a vase. When I saw saw the email alert for Chloris’ vase today, I was a bit concerned that she had ‘stolen’ my idea. But maybe hers is a different colour? Couldn’t bear to look before I’d completed my work. My pictures are terrible (as is the arrangement!), but it’s the taking part that counts, isn’t it?

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Anyway – my ‘vase’ uses Sedum spectabile, some branches of hazel, Miscanthus sinensis ‘Zebrinus’, autumn leaves from Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ and spent flowers of Perovskia atriplicifolia.

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That miscanthus is really rather splendid – it deserves better than this!

I have been unable to do any window-dressing at all due to lack of space around the container that my husband suggested might feature today. If you look at my previous post, you’ll understand.

This is my arrangement’s most elegant angle, I think – do you agree?

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Once again – a very happy anniversary to everyone – and especially to Cathy! Go and look at the links on Rambling in the Garden. This week they are bound to be a hoot! Oh, dear – sudden thought. Should I have taken this more seriously?

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