In a vase on Monday

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DSC_0160. Peony

Flowers don’t come much more luscious than peonies do they? It’s my favourite cut flower when I am actually buying, but I find them so hard to cut in my own garden. This autumn I think I’ll divide both my pink and white peonies (I’ve only the two, both unnamed) and take a piece of each down to the cutting garden to nurture. Oh the joy of having a garden dedicated to cut flowers!

They were only cut today because the rain has smashed the roses, peonies and many of the delphiniums to the ground and I hate seeing them lying there unappreciated.

I noticed how nice Linaria ‘Canon Went’ was looking on Saturday and thought I might use it on Monday, but wondered what should go with it. The rain solved that problem …

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Another rain-damaged plant was Crambe cordifolia. It was just starting to flower – only one massive inflorescence – and the rain broke the stem and left it for me to gather up.

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Thank goodness I had already taken pictures of it in the Rose Walk. I’m going to take some down below in the autumn (I think) – or at least be brave enough to do root cuttings. It looks lovely here but hasn’t really got the space to do its best.

Finally, I added Scabiosa atropurpurea.

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This is supposed to self-sow well. So far I haven’t noticed it here (although I did see a small seedling hitching a ride on a piece of Nepeta nervosa ‘Six Hills Giant’ that I put down in the wilder bit of the Hornbeam Gardens this spring. So perhaps it’s started!

I also bought three additional plants – with luck it should soon be well established here. Ideally I would have added a bit more of the scabious to my vase, but it looks so pretty in the border. I have to grit my teeth to cut any at all.

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So – my vase for Monday. Now go on over to Cathy’s blog at Rambling in the Garden and see what the other ‘Monday vasers’ are up to. I bet there’s lots of roses and sweet peas!

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49 thoughts on “In a vase on Monday

  1. G.F.

    Well now, that is a proper vase!
    Would even look good empty and I always like seeing stems shine through the water.
    I bemoan the loss of my P.”Sarah Bernhardt”. It seems they do not like my sandy soil. Lovely to see such riches of it here. I wish we could buy cut flowers like that over here. Not possible, unless one lives in London of course.

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      How right you are – London’s the place for gorgeous cut flowers. It is also good in Alsace/Basel area where we used to live. When I lived for a short period in a tiny upstairs flat in a town, I comforted myself with huge bunches of peonies from the florist. Thanks for visiting and leaving such a nice comment.

      Reply
  2. Christina

    Your vase is absolutely gorgeous today Cathy. I don’t really like peonies in the garden but as cut flowers they are so special. I can’t get crambe to survive here but I have taken root cuttings in the past and it wasn’t difficult. Maybe try a basal cutting next year then you won’t damage the parent plant.

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      Good idea, Christina. It’s supposed to be done from root cuttings and I’ve never had any success when I’ve saved seed. I have memories of losing two gorgeous plants in one year (they were the backbone of a border) in a previous garden. This has persisted for three years now, so it makes me nervous.

      Reply
  3. Adrian

    Hello Cathy, agree with Christina, miserable plant once the flowers are gone, but agree with you about the flowers. My favourite is still Sarah Bernhardt, more flowers than any other varieties, and flowers as big as most of the new ones.

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      I think it’s actually SB, Adrian. Everyone agrees (I do, really, but since I have never planted SB and grown it at home before, I was a bit nervous about giving it a name!) Thanks for visiting and leaving a comment.

      Reply
  4. pbmgarden

    Your peonies are sumptuous Cathy and the other materials you surrounded them with do them justice. Lovely photos as well. Generally I consider my entire little garden a cutting garden so I help myself to whatever looks like it would work in a vase. But I understand how you might be reluctant to cut a certain flower. Nature gave you a little nudge this week, but hope your future rains will be more gentle.

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      I hope they will be more gentle too – I like cutting flowers because it’s good for the actual plant. What bothers me, really, is that I don’t experiment with much in the way of treatment to make the cut flowers last, so they last longer in the garden. I think you are probably much more experienced than me on what to do!

      Reply
  5. bittster

    That is something, those peonies are fantastic. Is your header new and is that in your garden? The wall plantings look so well established.
    I went through the trouble of staking my clump, but the flowers are still so heavy it is a complete floppy mess. I should have cut them all since they look so much better in a vase.
    Have you ever heard of people wrapping the blooms and refrigerating for a later date? I remember reading about it once, and I almost think it was months through which the flowers could be saved. Peonies in July might be fun 🙂

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      I try to change the header with the seasons (weather) but it’s always in the garden. The rose in the header is R. banksiae ‘Lutea’ which I’m delighted to say grows like a weed here. Never heard of the cutting and putting in the refrigerator idea – but you know, Julie at Peonies & Posies says they are best cut when JUST showing some colour, so perhaps an excellent idea that could really work! I might just run down and cut the remaining buds now …

      Reply
  6. Cathy

    What a shame about your rain damage – so were the peonies damage limitation ones? They are gorgeous aren’t they? They look like Sarah B to me, not that I know much about peonies – mine is just about to flower for the first time in a few years although it was moved last year. I didn’t know scabious was meant to self seed – trying to establish that here and had some from Hayloft but not all have come through the winter 😦 Love the big rectangular vase – the perfect scale for the contents

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      Yes – I think it is SB, Cathy, as Joanna has suggested also. I just feel nervous about calling it by name. I don’t know where I read that about the scabious – it was a comment online, not something someone told me face to face, so I’m waiting to find out if it’s true or not! Hope your SB brings you a huge amount of joy!

      Reply
  7. Sam

    Gorgeous! Just absolutely lovely. I adore peonies as cut flowers, especially these pale pink ones, and all these plants, the Lineria, Crambe and scabious. A beautiful combination Cathy. (Sorry about the rain damage but at least you were able to make good use of them.)

    Reply
  8. Kris Peterson

    “Flowers don’t come much more luscious than peonies do they?” NO, they don’t!!! Although there’s a long list of flowers I regret I can’t grow in my climate, peonies are at the very top of that list. Your delicate pink peonies look perfect in your vase despite the battering they received from the rain. The addition of the other slender blooms did a nice job of accenting them too.

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      At least I’ve enjoyed them in the house, even if they’ve been flattened in the garden. But it’s so nice to blog, isn’t it, so that we can enjoy the things we can’t grow – in someone else’s garden!

      Reply
      1. Cathy Post author

        Yes – the continuously rainy outlook is discouraging at the moment. And I can see from my journal that in past years I’ve welcomed it with open arms. It’s always so dry here!

  9. Cathy

    Beautiful Cathy! Those peonies should be called Raspberry Ripple… The Linaria looks so pretty floating above the other flowers. I think we have had the same weather again – such heavy rain, flattening all our treasures!

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      Oh what a great name for that peony – although I think, as Joanna says, it is probably Sarah Bernhardt. You homed in on the thing that I adore about it – I keep getting up and looking again in the evening to enjoy that little dark red ripple. Yes, same weather. There’s always next year!

      Reply
  10. Julie

    Peonies are my absolute favourite and those are gorgeous – probably Sarah Bernhardt. Like you my garden has been suffering in the heavy rain – it always seems to come as the peonies open doesn’t it.

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      Thanks for confirming what I was thinking myself! We’ve had rain non-stop this year: most things have refused to germinate and the spectacular, short-lived stuff (old-fashioned roses, peonies …) have mostly been ruined. But there’s always another year! I had noticed that peonies were your favourite flower, Julie!

      Reply
  11. Joanna @edinburghgardendiary

    What a gorgeous display. You certainly haven’t let the rain get in the way of making a sumptuous arrangement! I’ve been considering adding some crambe to my garden for some time, and you may have convinced me to give it a go.

    Reply
  12. Anna

    I liked the build up to the creation of your most attractive vase Cathy. I must confess to have never grown peonies which is an oversight I must remedy forthwith. I was going to ask you the name of your gorgeous peony but … 🙂

    Reply
  13. Amy Myers

    Those peonies are magnificent! As is the rest of the vase 🙂 The linaria and crambe together make such a nice texture. I love the Lady Banks rose in your header also. It is said to grow quite well here, and I would like to use it at the front of the house, but I know so little about securing climbers 😦 Any advice would be welcome…!

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      I wish I knew more myself Amy – the banksian rose has already been off the wall once this year! Normally I would put three horizontal wires up and tie main stems as close to horizontal as possible (or could be more of a fan shape). It’s a start, but in my experience every rose is different.

      Reply
  14. Chloris

    Gorgeous! There is nothing as sumptuous as peonies for a vase. My SB is not yet out, I don’ t know if I could bear to cut them. Maybe it would be worth growing several just for cutting. I love peonies, not just for their opuleent blooms, but for the plump red buds in winter.

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      I only cut them when I can see they well otherwise be ruined. Yes – fun to grow some just for cutting. Would like to try some tree peonies.

      Reply
  15. Lucy Corrander

    I find it hard to cut flowers. They seem marooned when brought indoors. But sometimes, as here, a new garden can be created in a vase = and one is refreshed when seeing it.

    Reply
    1. Cathy Post author

      I find it hard to cut them as well, Lucy. I bring myself to do it when the weather is trashing them (as it is at the moment!) That’s why I am creating my cutting garden, so it’s not so hard!

      Reply

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